Dr. Catherine A. Deavel  portrait

Dr. Catherine A. Deavel

Associate Professor of Philosophy
Office
JRC 212
Phone
(651) 962-5372

Academic History

Ph.D., Philosophy, Fordham University, 2000
M.A., Philosophy, Fordham University, 1997
B.A., Philosophy and English, Seattle University 1995                       

Expertise

Ancient Greek Philosophy
History of Philosophy

Selected Publications

"Edith Stein and Fides et Ratio," in Reason and the Rule of Faith: Conversations in the Tradition with John Paul II, eds. Steven A. Long and Christopher J. Thompson (Lanham, Maryland: University of America Press, 2011): 177-196.

"Choosing Love: The Redemption of Severus Snape," co-authored with David Paul Deavel, in The Ultimate Harry Potter and Philosophy: Hogwarts for Muggles, ed. Gregory Basham (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2010): 39-49.

"Thomas Aquinas and Knowledge of Material Objects: Proper Objects of Cognition." Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Reason in Context, 83 (2010), pp. 273-282.

Clark's In the Deep Midwinter and Hansen's Atticus: Examples of a Two-fold Literature of Life," co-authored with David Paul Deavel, New Blackfriars 89 (November 2008): 657-73.

"Relational Evil, Relational Good: Thomas Aquinas and Process Thought," International Philosophical Quarterly, 2007 (peer-reviewed).

“Knowing When to Be Afraid: Rationality and Suspense,” co-authored with David Paul Deavel, invited chapter for Alfred Hitchcock and Philosophy, eds. Shawn Klein and David Baggett, Open Court Press (forthcoming, 2006).

“A Skewed Image: Harry Potter and the Nature of Evil,” co-authored with David Paul Deavel, invited chapter for If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts: Harry Potter and Philosophy, eds. Shawn Klein and David Baggett, Open Court Press, 2004.

Unity and Primary Substance for Aristotle,” Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, vol. 77, 2003, pp. 159-172 (peer-reviewed, approx. 30% acceptance rate).

Character, Choice, and Harry Potter,” co-authored with David P. Deavel, Logos: Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, 5:4, Fall 2002. (peer-reviewed, approx. 40% acceptance rate).

Why the Church Needs Art,” Response to an excerpt from John Paul II’s Letter to Artists, in “From a Logical Point of View,” Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, 5:3, Summer 2002.

"The Deceit of the Other: The Role of the Lie in Levinas' Totality and Infinity," Conference: A Journal of Philosophy and Theory 7.1 (1996) 85-92.

Selected Presentations

“Suffering and Evil,” Suffering and Hope conference, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, November 10-13, 2005.

“Woman and the Recovery of Culture: Reflections on Familiaris Consortio,” The Work of John Paul II and the Vocation of the Professional Woman: Summer Symposium, University of St. Thomas, June 14-18, 2004.

“The Virtuous Soul: Defending Against Simmias’ Harmony Argument,” International Conference on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Fordham University, New York, October 31-November 2, 2003.

“What is Catholic about Catholic Social Thought?” Catholic Social Thought Across the Curriculum Conference, University of St. Thomas, October 2003.

“Education toward Vocation,” Formation and Renewal conference, Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, October 2003.

“Immaterial Knowledge of the Material,” XXVIII International Patristic, Medieval, and Renaissance Conference, September 2003.  

“A Two-fold Strategy for a Literature of Life,” with David P. Deavel, From Death to Life: Agendas for Reform conference, Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, September 2002.

“The Divine Tragedy: Dante and Aristotle on Drama” for the 36th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2001.  

Fall 2020 Courses

Fall 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 200 - 01 Ancient Philosophy - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 230

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 230

Course Registration Number:

44041 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine A. Deavel

Alfred North Whitehead famously claimed that “[t]he safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.” Plato and Aristotle set the stage for nearly all of the philosophical systems—and battles—that come after them. We will work through texts of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle with a careful eye to their points of agreement and disagreement. These philosophers are searching for a comprehensive and rigorous understanding of reality, including the nature of human beings. Accordingly, the ancient Greeks turn their attention to a wide array of topics, such as metaphysics, physics, biology, politics, ethics, astronomy, and theology. We will give special attention to the development of substance metaphysics. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2021 Courses

J-Term 2021 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2021 Courses

Spring 2021 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CSMA 525 - 0 Philosophy Catholics Need - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25517 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine A. Deavel

In the first century, Christianity had already encountered and been influenced by philosophy of the ancient world. In the exchange between theology and philosophy, philosophers have provided both challenges to and defenses of Christian claims. Moreover, theology has often taken up philosophical concepts, systems of thought, and technical language. As a result, knowledge of philosophy is necessary in order to understand theology. This course aims to provide a basic understanding of select philosophical schools and concepts that constitute much of the foundation of Catholic theology, especially in the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. Special attention will be given to the work of Plato, Aristotle, and St. Thomas Aquinas. A guiding question in approaching this course will be, “What ought I know about philosophy in order better to understand my faith?

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 200 - 01 Ancient Philosophy - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24708 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine A. Deavel

A survey of the roots of philosophical inquiry in the classical period. The pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)