Fall 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ARHS 500 - 01 Methods & Approaches to AH - - W - - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 414

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

40337 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Craig D. Eliason

An introduction to the methods and problems of art history, including the theoretical approaches to art and its history, the examination and analysis of the work and its medium, the role of the museum and gallery in the study of art, and bibliographic tools of the different disciplines of the field.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARHS 530 - 01 #ChineseLandscape - T - - - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 311

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

41336 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Elizabeth J. Kindall

In 2018, a painting of a tree and rock sold at Christie’s Hong Kong for just over $60 million. The Chinese landscape tradition this painting represents stretches back three thousand years. This course examines the extensive history of this vibrant landscape painting tradition and its continued effect on contemporary transnational Chinese artists. Each course meeting will examine one contemporary artist and the many current and traditional dialogues (hashtags) of which she/he is a part. The various dynamic conversations, or streams of “metadata,” associated with the Chinese landscape and contemporary Western traditions found in her/his work will be the area of concentration for each class. The focal artists we examine will include Wu Guanzhong, Chen Chi-kwan, Zhang Hongtu, Xu Bing, Zao Wou-Ki, Cai Guo-Qiang, Liu Dan, Yang Yongliang, Qiu Zhijie, and Lin Tianmiao. Centuries-long dialogues regarding Song monumental and imperial mountainscapes, garden and topographical painting, literati ink studies, Chan Buddhist apparition painting, and kesi woven-silk works will be considered. Students are not expected to have a background in Chinese studies. All readings will be in English.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARHS 540 - 01 The Built Landscape of WWII M - - - - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 414

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

42078 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Victoria M. Young

This seminar will explore the role of war, specifically that of WWII (1939-1945), in the production of architecture and art across the world. It will also consider sites of battle as landscapes worthy of analysis, as many still retain the scars of this conflict up to the present day including the beaches of Normandy seventy-five years later. Memory and its power in creating spaces of commemoration will be an important focus of the class. The role of the artist, whether as chronicler or propagandist will be consider, along with a consideration of what happened to artists who were displaced during the conflict. Students will conduct individual research on a topic of their choice that leads to a twenty-page paper and twenty-minute oral presentation. Field trips will supplement seminar discussions. It will be helpful for you to read a short history of WWII prior to class commencing. Keywords: WWII, architecture, art, internment, Holocaust, atomic bomb, propaganda, commemoration, Normandy

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARHS 570 - 01 Museum Studies: Trends, Exhib. - - - R - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 414

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

43201 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Mickelson

Why do museums matter in the 21st century? This course provides students with the framework to investigate the critical issues facing museums today. Students will explore the practical skills necessary for successful careers in museums and consider the ways in which new audiences, technology, and innovative programming shape the museum field. This course will include opportunities for dialogue with museum professionals, hands-on projects, and field trips to apply museum studies theory to the visitor experience. Course readings, discussions and projects will address the ways in which museums have changed over time and how these changes have led to reinterpreted core values of museums in the present day. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, social objects, and blockbuster exhibitions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ARHS 510 - 01 Epic Narrative in Greek Art - - W - - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 414

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

21583 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark D. Stansbury-O'Donnell

Greek artists and viewers faced challenges in visually representing a story that the production teams of Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings do not face, including the fact that in most cases a single image had to represent the entire story and cue the viewer to the background and consequences of the action. Unlike most modern visual narratives, Greek stories were shared as part of the oral tradition and there was rarely an authorized canonical version; Greek viewers knew better than archaeologists both the stories and how to decode narrative images. This seminar will explore how visual narrative worked in ancient Greek art by focusing on the Trojan War in a range of media and periods to see how narratives function visually and how the meaning of a narrative shifts over time and place as the greater context changes. Each student will work on an epic narrative apart from the Trojan War, such as the story of the Argonauts or the Amazonomachy, for a seminar project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARHS 536 - 01 Conflict, Congress, and Place - - - R - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 414

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

21347 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William L. Barnes

Only a few Pre-Hispanic painted manuscripts survived the arrival of Europeans in Mesoamerica. However, the visual traditions of the region did not disappear overnight, and, for a few generations at least, documents continued to be made in the Native pictorial style. The content and focus of these documents varied greatly across the Late Postclassic (AD1325-1520s) and the early colonial and viceregal periods (ca. 1521-1570), as well as across various cultural and geographic boundaries – but they all share a few commonalities. This seminar will focus on some of those shared traits, namely the sense of place communicated by the artists and patrons of these documents and the significant events recorded as taking place within those spaces. Seminar participants will delve into the pictorial conventions used by the people of Mesoamerica to transmit information, the significance of books and book makers during this time, and the use that painted books were put to record history, interpret events (past, present, and, even, future), and, in the face of conquest and colonialism, preserve culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARHS 545 - 01 Neoclassical Art and Design - T - - - - - 1730 - 2030 OEC 414

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2030

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

21582 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Craig D. Eliason

In the second half of the eighteenth century, spurred by Enlightenment philosophies and new discoveries of the ancient world, a Neoclassical aesthetic emerged across all the visual arts in Europe. As the name given to this phenomenon suggests, Neoclassicism was both “new”—a radical change from the previous Rococo visual culture—and “classical”—committed to reviving the forms modeled by the ancient Greco-Roman world. Even the most studied emulations of antiquity, though, often betray an unmistakable character of the era in which they were made. What was the appeal of the Greco-Roman world in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Western Europe? Beyond references to the past, what were the key characteristics of the style? How did the movement intersect with revolutionary politics, imperial identity, rationalist philosophy, international travel, and academies of the arts? Does Neoclassicism’s overt relationship to the past obscure the importance it had in laying the foundation for its future—that is, our modern world? We will consider art and design as varied as paintings by David and Kauffmann, sculptures by Canova and Thorvaldsen, architecture by Soufflot and Adam, theoretical writings by Laugier and Winckelmann, and typeface designs by Bodoni and Didot. We will discuss the aesthetics of purity, restraint, and whiteness, and consider how gender maps onto Enlightenment binaries as reflected in the arts. Student research projects can offer a deeper focus on material we cover together, or can extend consideration to other mediums (e.g., costume design, furniture design), other periods (e.g., the “neoclassicism” of mid-twentieth-century Fascist architecture or of late-twentieth-century postmodernist architecture), or other areas (e.g., American Neoclassical sculpture, British colonial architecture in India).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Independent Study

Past topics have included:

  • Modern Art On Trial
  • Minnesota Architecture
  • Edward Curtis
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • Russian Photography
  • Contemporary Mosaic Art
  • Art of Darwinism
  • Kew Gardens Pagoda
  • Islamic Painting
  • Islamic Architecture
  • Women in Aztec Society
  • Frank Lloyd Wright